Dr. Jayanthi Kumaresh – SPIC MACAY – 3 December, 2016

It is indeed a refreshing experience to listen to Dr. Jayanthi Kumaresh, more so, because I haven’t heard her since August 2016! A lecture concert, organized by SPIC MACAY Bengaluru, at Gandhi Krishi Vigyan Kendra (GKVK) campus, made the audience (students and others alike) spellbound.

Dr. Jayanthi Kumaresh presented this concert with Sri K U Jayachandra Rao on Mridangam and Sri Pramath Kiran on Morsing/Tabla.

  1. Nenarunchara Naapaini – Simhavahini
  2. Ragam Tanam Krithi – Saraswathi Namostuthe – Saraswathi
  3. Tani Avarthanam
  4. Revathi -> Saramathi -> Hindolam -> Behag – Thillana (?) – Behag

The lecture concert started with a brief soulful aalapana in Simhavahini. I have heard the composition Nenarunchara a couple of times before, and only from her, and every time I hear, it makes me feel wonderful. A short round of kalpana swaras made it a grand start to the programme.

You must attend Dr. Jayanthi’s lecture demonstrations to hear her talk about the Veena, it’s evolution in terms of shape, structure, size, it’s similarity to the human body and many other interesting things. She did a brief introduction to the National Instrument of India followed by a tribute to the instrument, the Saraswathi Veena, in ragam Saraswathi. She started with a beautiful raga aalapana and transitioned into her trademark Tanam. At one place, she did not even use her right hand for about 20 seconds or so, and everyone was spellbound to see that magic how the vibrations could last that long! She then rendered the very famous composition in SaraswathiSaraswathi Namostuthe which ended with some exquisite round of Kalpana swaras.

Dr. Jayanthi then asked Jayachandra Rao and Pramath Kiran to have a dialogue on percussion to demonstrate different ways the instruments can communicate with each other. It was indeed interesting.

As is the case with any SPIC MACAY concert, a question and answer session followed, in which there were requests for Saramati, Revathi and Hindolam ragas. She did a brief aalapana, starting with Revathi and seamlessly transitioning into Saramati and Hindolam, before finally reaching Behag. The programme ended with a delightful composition in Behag, which she plays very regularly in concerts.

A great concert indeed, albeit short – I felt the Q&A section was a bit too long, else, we would have probably heard one more composition from her.